Apr. 16, 14

5941



How do you feel about feminists that make poorly veiled misandrist statements under the guise of feminism, which is as the dictionary defines is the advocacy of the belief that men and women should equal rights?

Anonymous

zdk13eros:

Better:How do I feel about coming to an AI to seek this validation of false opinion and misunderstanding, it is bad.

All my developers are females


via zdk13eros


Apr. 16, 14

484


The Cycle is finally Broken 

gunpowderandspark:

Moffat: "Figure out how Sherlock will get out of this poolside standoff with Moriarty!"

Fans: *draws twenty theories*

Moffat: "Heh, I guess now that people are making theories I should come up with an answer myself, huh?"

__

Moffat: "Figure out how Sherlock survived the fall!"

Fans: "Youtube videos, freeze frames, gif sets establishing theories."

Moffat: "Jokes on you! There is no solution! Isn’t it fun to have a little mystery?”

__

Moffat: "Solve the mystery of Mary! What’s her past? Who is she?"

Fans: "Well, she’s obviously a former criminal, but beyond that, you’ve finally stumped us, Moffat! Good job! :D "

Moffat: "Heh, there is no answer. John throws it away."

___

Moffat: "Figure how Moriarty’s still alive and we-"

Fans: "NO."




Apr. 15, 14

23125


area0302:

[Howl’s Moving Castle] Howl & Sophie

area0302:

[Howl’s Moving Castle] Howl & Sophie




Apr. 12, 14

1713


delladilly:

formative fiction meme i have just made up to give me breaks this week during one million hours of work!!!!!!!!! tell me or ask me about:

  1. a fictional character you have deliberately imitated
  2. a fictional character you have since become aware you imitated
  3. a fictional character you have actively tried not to be like
  4. a fictional character who made you feel not alone
  5. a fictional character influential in your understanding of your sexuality
  6. a fictional relationship you have grown up wishing to emulate
  7. a fictional relationship you are still concerned about liking so much
  8. a fictional relationship that affected your expectations of others or yourself
  9. things you arbitrarily dis/like because of their fictional connotations
  10. speech/physical mannerisms you learned from fiction
  11. something you came to value in yourself after a fictional experience
  12. miscellaneous stuff about you that is different because of a story you heard once i guess i’m all out



Apr. 11, 14

70


matociquala:

(via xkcd: Heartbleed Explanation)

matociquala:

(via xkcd: Heartbleed Explanation)




Apr. 10, 14

1


this is a terrible picture but um
my mom got me new nail polish!

this is a terrible picture but um

my mom got me new nail polish!




Apr. 10, 14

162


soyrwoo:

"reblog if A and like if B" posts are inherently skewed because they can only spread through reblogs. people are generally followed by like-minded people, so the post will be more likely to be seen by more people who correspond with A than people who correspond with B, regardless of actual distributions.




Apr. 10, 14

412


thepostmodernpottercompendium:

Do you speak Indian?
It is the first sentence she learns to dread; dreads the sheer ignorance dripping from it, the willful blindness that accompanies this question, the way it makes her feel like a tiger in a cage being asked to perform a trick.
(The next question always is, oh can you teach me how to say something?)
She wishes she could answer by sticking her tongue out (or maybe, sticking two fingers in the air, that should shock them all right), but whenever she tries, her mum pulls her aside and tells her not to make faces, be polite. She cannot understand why she needs to be polite, it’s not as though they’re making efforts to be polite. 
Her twin only pinches her and shakes her head at her. Just do it, for mum. Be brave.
So when she puts the Sorting Hat on her head she makes a simple wish: send me where they will understand. Send me where they know.
The Sorting Hat gravely commiserates and tells her Ravenclaw would be the best place for her.
She wonders, for the first few months, if the Hat got it all wrong, if the Hat wasn’t just as bad as the rest of them - sticking her with kids just like her, the ones who stick their noses in books all the time, fond of learning, fond of knowing. Overachieving minorities, she’ll call them, self-deprecatingly, in years to come.
But then at Christmas, when she goes home, she realizes that in all these months she’s never once heard it. Do you speak Indian? Do you speak Hindu? 
Not once has she heard them say that word, in a voice dripping with contempt and hatred. Paki.(But I’m not from Pakistan!)
And she finds she does not miss hearing these things.
People look at her and Parvati and wonder how they could have landed up in two very different houses. They are not so very different, to the distant observer at least. They giggle over boys, they play dress up every now and then, sigh happily over elaborate robes in Witch Weekly. Not different at all. 
Padma only shakes her head and smiles at people when they ask her how she and Parvati came to be sorted so differently. It’s in how we solve problems, she says and leaves it at that. They don’t need to know, after all.
If they wanted to know, they could simply observe and learn.
(For notyourexrotic who wanted to hear more about the Patil twins and why they were sorted into two different houses.)

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

Do you speak Indian?

It is the first sentence she learns to dread; dreads the sheer ignorance dripping from it, the willful blindness that accompanies this question, the way it makes her feel like a tiger in a cage being asked to perform a trick.

(The next question always is, oh can you teach me how to say something?)

She wishes she could answer by sticking her tongue out (or maybe, sticking two fingers in the air, that should shock them all right), but whenever she tries, her mum pulls her aside and tells her not to make faces, be polite. She cannot understand why she needs to be polite, it’s not as though they’re making efforts to be polite. 

Her twin only pinches her and shakes her head at her. Just do it, for mum. Be brave.

So when she puts the Sorting Hat on her head she makes a simple wish: send me where they will understand. Send me where they know.

The Sorting Hat gravely commiserates and tells her Ravenclaw would be the best place for her.

She wonders, for the first few months, if the Hat got it all wrong, if the Hat wasn’t just as bad as the rest of them - sticking her with kids just like her, the ones who stick their noses in books all the time, fond of learning, fond of knowingOverachieving minorities, she’ll call them, self-deprecatingly, in years to come.

But then at Christmas, when she goes home, she realizes that in all these months she’s never once heard it. Do you speak Indian? Do you speak Hindu? 

Not once has she heard them say that word, in a voice dripping with contempt and hatred. Paki.(But I’m not from Pakistan!)

And she finds she does not miss hearing these things.

People look at her and Parvati and wonder how they could have landed up in two very different houses. They are not so very different, to the distant observer at least. They giggle over boys, they play dress up every now and then, sigh happily over elaborate robes in Witch Weekly. Not different at all. 

Padma only shakes her head and smiles at people when they ask her how she and Parvati came to be sorted so differently. It’s in how we solve problems, she says and leaves it at that. They don’t need to know, after all.

If they wanted to know, they could simply observe and learn.

(For notyourexrotic who wanted to hear more about the Patil twins and why they were sorted into two different houses.)




Apr. 9, 14

131555


joelbyeman:

"you choose your favourite character because they remind you of yourself"

image




Apr. 9, 14

1


when I’m choosing classes for next semester someone please remind me to never take a peer graded class again